As just about any New Yorker will tell you, when it comes to the five boroughs of New York City, each one is a unique flavor unto itself. And the residents of each borough will argue the merits of their neighborhood over the others, to no end.

Each borough has it’s own strengths, and we don’t want to start any kind of a New York civil war, but if you are thinking about moving somewhere else in the city, you’ll need to weigh up all of the benefits and disadvantages of relocating to a different borough. If you are looking into local moving, hopefully this will help you to better decide where to live in NYC.

Manhattan

Population (2014 est.): 1,636,268

The most famous and recognizable borough outside of New York City, Manhattan is a natural draw for tourists and new residents, but for a multitude of reasons it is not the first choice of boroughs for New Yorkers looking to move. The main reason for this is the incredibly high cost of living in Manhattan. Combine this with the lack of living space and you have a tough neighborhood to break into. Many New Yorkers are also turned off by the tourism aspect of this area. Having said that, there is a major benefit to living in the area if you work there, saving money and time on commuting. Additionally, in a recent Homes.com survey, Manhattan was voted the friendliest of the five boroughs, receiving 27 percent of the vote.

Brooklyn

Population: 2,621,793

Jay Z’s hometown has undergone an interesting shift in recent years. Increasing gentrification of the area has led the place—once viewed as an affordable alternative to Manhattan—to become one of the most expensive places to live in the US. However, if you can find a place in your price range, Brooklyn has a lot of evidence to back up its reputation as the “cool” borough. Food and art is flourishing, and there are plenty of museums, parks, and other attractions to make it a great place to live.

Queens

Population: 2,321,580

Queens is the largest of the five boroughs, geographically, and cited by many as the best place to experience “true” New York. This is because it is one of the most ethnically diverse urban areas in the world—48 percent of its residents (as of 2014) were foreign born. The size of Queens means that there is also diversity in housing options, ranging from high rises to more suburban neighborhoods, so you are likely to be able to fit something that fits your needs. Perhaps that is the reason why it is also one of the most expensive places to live in the US. Of course, cost of living is all relative in New York City, so Queens might be a good alternative to Manhattan or Brooklyn, if you don’t mind the commute.

Staten Island

Population: 473,279

If you want to be in New York, but not of New York, Staten Island is the natural choice. Feeling more like a suburb, Staten Island has the kind of space and family neighborhood feel that you don’t get elsewhere in the city. It’ll be a long commute if you work in Brooklyn or Manhattan, but if you have a family and you want that sort of a community, it’ll probably be worth it.

The Bronx

Population: 1,438,159

Once the most troubled and maligned part of New York City, the Bronx has seen a gradual revitalization since the 1990s, and is finally starting to thrive as never before. Affordable housing initiatives have attracted an influx of new residents, and the area’s character mixed with new residents has created a fertile ground for a cultural revival as well. According to this survey, it is still the least popular of the five boroughs, but new investments in both tech and real estate in the city could make it the place to be for the future.

Each of the five boroughs has something different to offer, but if you take the time to visit and research each one, there is no doubt that you can find the right one for you. When you find the your next hood, make sure you hire qualified movers NYC  to get you there. It is a huge city, but each person experiences life in New York in their own unique way. Now it’s time to find yours.